Morning tea to help foster cultural understanding

23/04/2018

Hurstville Museum & Gallery invites the public to a special morning tea event to view the latest spotlight display, a changing display which features migrant stories of people in the local area, and has been part of the permanent exhibition since 2015.

St George Stories: people – places – community provides the Museum & Gallery the opportunity to tell the varied stories of residents who have migrated to the area, including those of the growing Nepalese population.

The Nepalese community is now the fastest growing overseas-born community in the Georges River area in recent years, forming the second largest after the Chinese community.

The number of persons who were born in Nepal now living in the local government area has increased from 1,729 in 2011 to 4,810 in 2016.

From February to July 2018, visitors to the Museum & Gallery will be able to learn about the migration story of the Tiwari family, who left Nepal due to instability, economic crisis and civil unrest.

The display looks at how the family members have adapted to Western customs, yet continue to embrace and celebrate their Nepalese culture.

Manohar and Priti Tiwari, both from Kathmandu, decided to migrate to New Zealand and then later to Australia via the skilled migration scheme, for better job opportunities as an accountant and nurse respectively.

“We have modified our traditions a little bit since living in Australia. We still keep the good parts, getting together, eating and celebrating,” said the Tiwaris.

The display is supported by Advance Diversity Services.

Special event
In conjunction with the Australian Heritage Festival 2018, Hurstville Museum & Gallery invites the public to join us for morning tea and some delicious Nepalese food.

When: Saturday, 12 May 2018, 10.30am
Where: Hurstville Museum & Gallery, MacMahon Street, Hurstville
Free event, all welcome.

To RSVP visit the ‘what’s on’ page at www.georgesriver.nsw.gov.au