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Land valuations

Under the Valuation of Land Act 1916, land value is the value of your land only. It does not include the value of your home or other structures and improvements.

Changes to your Land Valuation

The Valuer General has released new property values that will be applied to rates from 1 July 2020 to 30 June 2023. The most recent valuation is based on property sales in your area around 1 July 2019. (For further details, view the newsletter issued by the Valuer General of NSW or visit their website here.)

How Land Valuation Affects Rates

Council uses the land value of properties throughout the LGA to determine the level of rates each property owner should pay. The changes to land valuations may impact the rates you pay to Council each year. Changes to land valuations:

  • Affects the amount individual ratepayers contribute to the total rate income by causing a redistribution of the rates charged across categorised properties. 
  • Do not necessarily lead to similar increases/decreases in rates (i.e. individual rates may not go up and down in line with the property value)
  • Does not affect how much rates income is collected in total by Council.
Council's total rate income can only increase by the percentage known as the rate peg or a Special Rate Variation (SRV) which is set by IPART (Independent Pricing and Regulatory Tribunal.


Land Valuation Frequently Asked Questions

  • How will I know what the value of my land is?

    The NSW Valuer General has issued Valuation Notices to owners of properties in the Georges River Council Local Government area from March 2020. If you have not received a Valuation Notice, you can contact the NSW Valuation Service on 1800 110 038. 

  • Why is the valuation increase for my suburb different than other suburbs?

    Land valuations are carried out every three years and the most recent valuation is based on property sales in your area around 1 July 2019. Because land valuations are done as a snapshot on a certain date, suburbs can be at different points in the property market on that date, leading to differences in valuations, even for neighbouring suburbs.

    A big increase in land valuation since the last valuation could indicate a lift in the property market in your suburb or that your property was at the low part of the market at the time of the last valuation, and has now caught up with the market.

    A small increase in land valuation could indicate a flat property market for your suburb or that your property was at the high part of the market at the time of the last valuation, with only a small increase as other suburbs catch up with the market. 

  • What if I don't agree with the land valuation of my property?

    Information about the NSW Valuer General’s valuation process and how to request a review is issued with the valuation notices. It is very important to read that information as it explains what you should do if you have concerns about your valuation and how to go about requesting a review of your valuation. In addition, the NSW Land & Property Information and NSW Valuer General’s Office websites contain information on the valuation process and how to request a review/lodge an objection.

    If you don’t agree with the land value, you have 60 days to object. You can lodge an objection online using the objection portal on the Valuer General website or contacting the Valuer General by calling 1800 110 038 to receive your objection kit by post or email.

    If you lodge an objection, you must still pay your rates while your objection is being considered (Section 36 of the Valuation of Land Act 1916). Whatever the Valuer General decides about your objection, they must advise you in writing. If you still don’t agree with the valuation, you have limited time to appeal to the Land and Environment Court. The response sent by the Valuer General will explain the final date for an appeal.

    All enquiries should be directed to Valuer General NSW.

  • If my land valuation is changed, will Council adjust my rates?

    Council will adjust your rates once Valuer General NSW have completed their review and provided Council with amended land values.

  • If the value of my land increases, does that mean Council's total rate income will also increase?

    No, Council’s rate income in total can only increase by the percentage increase (known as the rate peg or a Special Rate Variation) which is set by IPART.

    Changes to land valuations:

    • Affects the amount individual ratepayers contribute to the total rate income by causing a redistribution of the rates charged across categorised properties. 
    • Do not necessarily lead to similar increases/decreases in rates (i.e. individual rates may not go up and down in line with the property value)
    • Does not affect how much rates income is collected in total by Council.

     



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